Teaching children about missionary work and the poor of the earth

I have mused for some time how unfortunate it is that we no longer do missionary presentations when missionaries come home. I think hearing about someone being taught the gospel and changing their life changes missionary work from an academic duty into the reality of saving souls, and doing that helps one move away from the idea that it is a two year experience.

I realized youtube should have some missionary slideshows. Most of them are pretty lame – i.e. a bazillion pictures of a missionary and his companions. Who wants to see that?

But I found a few good ones, and most notably a channel devoted to missionary stories. Playing one of these occasionally as part of scripture study has been one of those things that has been profound in our family I think, so I wanted to pass it on.

I think this one had a profound effect in changing the meaning of missionary work for our children

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TrS0CH2Geg

I liked this one (no words, and I swapped out the music )

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lMvHkTdZ5U

I stopped it at several points and pointed out what the homes looked like to the kids, and went over the D&C 38 parable.

And there is a channel is devoted to missionary stories. Not all of it is worthwhile, but considering the amount of flack I had to wade through to find anything half this good, here it is (they have videos organized by country if you scroll down):

https://www.youtube.com/user/PreparetoServe/featured

I also think seeing faithful members and converts enduring real poverty is important for our youth. (Someone is going to be upset that I qualified that with “faithful members” but the D&C 38 parable backs me up on that). On my mission there was lots of poverty, but there was no escape from real poverty without deciding to first leave drugs and serial immorality behind.

It rings differently and more resoundingly in the soul to see faithful members and converts whom Christ has removed the slums from, but who have no means to remove themselves from the slums. Sure, we can help both, but the more potent and pressing image is the ironic one.

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