The differing punishments of men and women in 2 Nephi 13

It is interesting that there are punishments for the men, and punishments for the women both listed in 2 Nephi 13.

Of the men we read:
2 Nephi 13:25 Thy men shall fall by the sword and thy mighty in the war.
And of the women we read:
2 Nephi 13:16 Moreover, the Lord saith: Because the daughters of Zion are haughty, and walk with stretched-forth necks and wanton eyes, walking and mincing as they go, and making a tinkling with their feet—
17 Therefore the Lord will smite with a scab the crown of the head of the daughters of Zion, and the Lord will discover their secret parts.
18 In that day the Lord will take away the bravery of their tinkling ornaments, and cauls, and round tires like the moon;
19 The chains and the bracelets, and the mufflers;
20 The bonnets, and the ornaments of the legs, and the headbands, and the tablets, and the ear-rings;
21 The rings, and nose jewels;
22 The changeable suits of apparel, and the mantles, and the wimples, and the crisping-pins;
23 The glasses, and the fine linen, and hoods, and the veils.
24 And it shall come to pass, instead of sweet smell there shall be stink; and instead of a girdle, a rent; and instead of well set hair, baldness; and instead of a stomacher, a girding of sackcloth; burning instead of beauty.
It is rarely noted that these two punishments are adapted to the misbehavior we see by the men and  the women in the church. 
In general, the men are more likely to get into moral trouble. These days, there are already many men in the church who have fallen into the web of pornography. Immorality, including pornography, is like setting off a bomb in a person’s life. It destroys a person spiritually, leaving little left in its wake. It is a spiritual kaboom that can turn a righteous king David into a man that is worthy of hell. 
By contrast, our women are involved to a degree in immorality, but to a much lesser degree. However, they are almost universally afflicted with feminism. They have stretch-forth necks and are haughty. They don’t think they are. But they look down at their demure ancestors with scoffing, and even a sense of indignation and disdain toward their meekness, gentleness, and quiet humility. This is very different than immorality. It is not a bomb that blows up and destroys a person. It is more like a sickness that afflicts the general population of women in the church. They have pride and animosity over it. They are even proud and self righteous about their feminist pride and feminist animosity. 
And it is interesting that the punishments offered to the men and women in 2 Nephi 13 match up with the type of misbehavior we are seeing.
In 2 Nephi 13 the men are punished with death.  That is pretty serious punishment. It matches the seriousness of the misbehavior. When ancient Israel was immoral, the Lord frequently used exactly this sort of punishment, such as when he sent a plague that was stayed by Phinehas’ righteous zeal. Immorality, like death, usually doesn’t destroy a person half way. Immorality is like a bomb that leaves spiritual death in its wake. The punishment given to the men of the church in 2 Nephi 13 matches the type of misbehavior we are seeing in the men of the church.
In 2 Nephi 13 the women are punished with scabs on the crowns of their head, stink instead of sweet smell, baldness instead of well set hair, torn clothing of sackcloth in place of fashionable clothing with accessories, burning instead of beauty. They aren’t punished with death, but with intense physical ailments and with clothing like that of refugees that is a mockery of the beauty that women desire for themselves. They become, visually, the antithesis of a picture of beauty and feminity.
And that punishment matches the misbehavior we are seeing in the women of the church. 
The punishments of the men and of the women match the misbehaviors we are seeing in the men and the women of the church.
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John Robertson

I am nothing more than a regular member of the church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

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